Royal Philips Electronics conducted a broad survey on the subject of Singaporeans’ health and well-being, as part of The ‘+’ Project by Philips in Singapore. A total of 6,833 Singaporeans took part in Philips’ survey and shared their views on personal health and well-being concerns in the country. The online survey, conducted over 10 weeks, showed 78% of respondents are satisfied with their quality of life, and that a key determinant is their work-life balance.

Here are the key findings of The ‘+’ Project survey

  • Only 20% of Singaporeans go for health screenings at least once a year
  • 66% feel that they are in good physical health but only 34% exercise weekly
  • 63% of Singaporeans rate health and well-being of children as good, but are concerned and want to improve this further

Other key factors determining Singaporeans’ satisfaction with their quality of life include their views on children’s health and well-being  (a 5.7% weighting within overall score), the quality of support systems for new parents and breastfeeding mothers (4.7% weighting), and the frequency of having nutritious meals (4.1% weighting).

Philips Plus Project Survey Results

Singaporeans feel that they are in good physical health – eat well, but do not exercise regularly enough

66% of Singaporeans feel that they have good physical health, with 49% of the respondents having nutritious meals a few times a week or more. Amongst those who are very or completely satisfied with their eating habits, 85% have nutritious meals a few times a week or more. However, only 34% of the respondents exercise at least once a week or more. Interestingly, respondents in the older age group of 45-80 years of age (39.5%) are exercising more frequently than those within the 25-34 age group (35%).

The level of satisfaction with eating habits is determined by how regularly respondents have nutritious meals. But the survey data highlights Singaporeans are not exercising regularly or frequently enough. An area of improvement in 2013 is to combine healthy eating with more regular and frequent exercises to improve Singaporeans’ physical health.

Health screenings and lack of life-saving skills identified as areas of improvement

Despite the high standards of healthcare and efforts to encourage regular health screenings, only 20% of respondents go for health screenings at least once a year, with 40% rarely, or never at all. The majority of the respondents who go for health screenings at least once a year, fall within the 45-80 age group.

Although cardiac-related ailments account for 23.5% of deaths in Singapore, it was found that more than 60% of the local residents polled have no knowledge or only basic knowledge of sudden cardiac arrests and the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Given that 67% of cardiac arrests occur in residential areas, but only 20% of bystanders are able to respond with CPR, there is an urgent need to do more to educate Singaporeans on cardiac-related issues and equip them with life-saving skills.

Philips health surveySingaporeans concerned about health and well-being of children, feel support for new parents is sufficient

Despite the fact that 63% of the respondents feel that the health and well-being of children in Singapore is good, the majority still voted for the Healthier Schools, Brighter Kids idea. This reflects a general concern for our children’s health and well-being, and the desire of Singaporeans to do even more to create healthy learning environments for children here. In addition, 60% of the respondents feel that quality of support systems for new parents and breastfeeding mothers are currently sufficient, though only 56% claimed to possess no more than basic knowledge of infant nutrition and care.

About The ‘+’ Project by Philips Online Survey
The online survey was conducted on The ‘+’ Project dedicated digital platform, www.philips.com.sg, over a ten week period from September to November 2012. The survey gives useful insights into Singaporeans’ health and well-being concerns.